Tag Archive | Belajar

English Phrasal Verbs (Part 3)

Part III

  1. Log on(to) to connect to the internet/a website

I open the new website, but I can’t log on; Maybe it’s under construction.

  1. Look after to take care of

Looking after a kitten is not an easy job.

  1. Look up to try to find information in a book, etc.

It rarely happens to me looking up unknown words in the dictionary since I’m getting used to search for information in the online dictionary.

  1. Make up to invent an explanation, excuse, etc.

What an ignorant boy! I can’t make up his unforgiveable mistakes.

  1. Move in to start living in a new house, etc.

I’m moving in Kyiv next month.

  1. Pay back to return money (to someone)

I feel ashamed to the owner of pet shop since I’ve never paid the money back that I borrowed two weeks ago.

  1. Pick up to lift something from the floor, a table, etc.

Kids, pick your toys up and start studying!

  1. Point out to tell someone important information

I point you out that I work every day; It’s the reason why I can’t meet you so often.

  1. Print out to make a paper copy of something on a computer

I seldom buy original books from e-bay. I only search for the free downloadable e-book versions and print them out; It’s much cheaper!

  1. Pull off to break by pulling

The careless dentist pulled my son’s tooth off by mistake yesterday; Now, I accuse and sconce him to pay $3.000.000

  1. Put away to return something to where it belongs

Thanks for borrowing the beautiful flowers; You don’t need to worry because  I’ve already put them away in the vase.

  1. Put back to return something to where it was

I want to put this book back; but i forget which rack it belongs to.

  1. Put down to stop holding

My girlfriend put her hand down from my arm when she came across her ex.

  1. Put off to delay to a later time

To put off is similar with to procrastinate, the words which I hate very much.

  1. Put on to gain (weight)

If I were you, i would put on. It’s terrible! I only can see bone and skin.

  1. Put on to start wearing (a piece of clothing)

Put your jackets and scarf on if you don’t want to get cold outside.

  1. Put out to make something stop burning

Unfortunately, the unexperienced firefighters couldn’t put the ferocious fire out resulting many ablaze electronics burnt like those in the hell.

  1. Put up to put something on a wall (ex. a picture)

We’re going to take a valentine’s day competition. Notice that the best love letters will be put up in the lobby.

  1. Read out to say something out loud which you are reading

If you want to remember the new vocabulary fast, read the words out.

  1. Rip up to tear into pieces

This illegal application letter should be ripped up asap to avoid fights.

  1. Rub out to remove with a rubber

The imprudent students can’t rub out his wrong answers since he’s written everything in ink.

  1. Run away (from) to escape by running

The little girl screams and runs away from a giant monster.

  1. Run out (of) to not have any left

Damn, we’re on the way to the jungle and now we run out of the fuel!

  1. Save up (for) to save money (for a specific purpose)

I’ve been saving up for 1 year for taking a vacation abroad.

  1. Send off to make a player leave a game

What a sly player! I wish the referee sent him off.

  1. Set off to start a journey

Finally I get my long holiday and I’m able to set off to explore the beauty of my country.

  1. Set up to start (a business, organization, etc.)

This unexperienced man had set up a leather company, but he failed in only 3 months.

English Phrasal Verbs (Part 2)

Part II

  1. Get away with to escape punishment for

The villain, who has been in the prison for three times, had robbed the bank, but he got away with it.

  1. Get in(to) to enter a car

What a careless man! Take the purse then get into the car quickly!

  1. Get off to leave a bus, train etc.

I always get off the school bus at 7.30

  1. Get on (with) to have a good relationship (with)

Melannie can get on with everybody easily.

  1. Get on (to) to enter a bus, train etc.

You must show the ticket to the conductor after getting on the train.

  1. Get out (of) to leave a car, building, room, etc.

Quick! Get out of the car or you’ll become roast corpse!

  1. Get over to recover from (an illness)

I usually need a week to get over from flu.

  1. Get up to leave your bed

What a lazy girl! She’s always getting up after 8!

  1. Give away to give something free of charge

They’ll give a bar of chocolate away if you show that today is your birthday.

  1. Give back to return something you’ve taken/borrowed

I never give the books back to the library before the due date.

  1. Give up to stop doing something you do regularly

Enough already! I give up playing video games 3 hours a day!

  1. Go away to leave a place/someone

“You are disgusting! Telling my big secret to everyone without feeling any guilty. Now, go away!”

  1. Go back (to) to return (to)

I believe that someday I will go back to meet you in the promised land.

  1. Go off to no longer be fresh

These avocadoes have already gone off! I can’t consume them or I’ll get matters with my belly.

  1. Go on to continue happening or doing something

I go on with my homework in the classroom despite being scolded by teachers.

  1. Go on to happen

Please, don’t fire me! I assure that this pathetic experience will never go on anymore in the future.

  1. Go out to stop burning

The electronic centre, which I’m used to visiting, burnt at night and didn’t go out until the firefighter came late.

  1. Go out with to be the boyfriend/girlfriend of

Matthew is going out with Katie for 3 years now, after they met on a blind date.

  1. Grow up to become older (for children)

My cats grow up fast as I give them a lot of protein and meat.

  1. Hang on to wait

Hang on, I must answer to my mother’s question first.

  1. Hang up to put clothes in a wardrobe, etc.

I can’t hang up my clothes since I don’t have any wardrobes.

  1. Hang up to put the receiver down to end a phone call

I don’t like people who hang up without saying ‘good-bye’, it sounds rude to me!

  1. Have on to wear (a piece of clothing)

The cats have cute clothes on and are ready to hang out with my dog.

  1. Hurry up to do something more quickly

If I go with my father, I won’t need to hurry up preparing the equipment for picnic since he’s such a slow person.

  1. Join in to participate, take part

This time tomorrow I will be joining in the play.

  1. Keep out to prevent from entering

You can’t step on the grass, there’s plank written “keep out!”

  1. Leave out to not include

I don’t like Stanislav and Slava, so I leave them out attending my party.

  1. Let down to disappoint

My students’ bad behaviour always let me down.

  1. Lie down to start lying (on a bed, etc.)

I’m so tired that I lie down without take my jacket down.

  1. Log off to disconnect from the Internet/a website

I don’t know how to log off from this messy website since the appearance isn’t rather user friendly.

Inversion

 

Inversion

Inversion => Change the order of something

Using with negative expressions (Verb – Subject – Verb):
Not only did he win, but he also broke the record
Under no circumtances should you call her (=> in no situation, should you call)
The mayor of Toronto refused to resign, nor do we expect him to

In a very formal style (you can also find these in essays)
Should you need any help, don’t hesitate to call (=>Should = if [more formal])
Had I known you were coming (If I had known you were coming…)

Comparatives:
John speaks Chinese, as does Lucy
More impostant than love is money

Some expressions:
Here comes Jane.
Man, is it cold out! (=> the function is only to emphasize)
Are you sure? (notice that in all question sentences, inversion happens)

EXERCISE
1. “Had I not fallen asleep before the end of the movie, I’d have found out who killed the Minister.”
This sentence can be rewritten as:
a) If I didn’t fall asleep before the end of the movie, I will find out who killed the Minister.
b) If I hadn’t fallen asleep before the end of the movie, I’d have found out who killed the Minister.
c) If I’d known who killed the Minister, I would not have fallen asleep near the end of the movie.
d) I know who killed the Minister. It was the butler.

2. Complete the following sentence:
You do not have to say anything to the police, nor_______________
a) are you required to sign any documents.
b) you are required to sign any documents.
c) you have to sign anything.

3. Not only _____________ pass the test, but he got the highest mark in the class!
a) Joe did
b) Joe didn’t
c) didn’t Joe
d) did Joe

4. What is the subject of the following sentence?
“Here comes Michael.”
a) Here
b) comes
c) Michael

5. Which of the following sentences uses inversion to express disbelief, shock, or strong emotion?
a) He is a such a man!
b) Man, is he brave!
c) He is a brave man.
d) Is he brave?

6. “More important than your application will be your interview.”
What does this sentence mean?
a) Your application will be more important than your interview.
b) Your interview will be more important than your application.
c) More importantly, your application will then be your interview.

7. Under no circumstances _________ reach your hand out of the bus.
a) you can
b) you shouldn’t
c) should you
d) shoulder you

8. “Should you need some advice, call me.”
This sentence can be rewritten as:
a) Call me if you need some advice.
b) If you call me, I’ll advise you.
c) Should you call me for advice?
d) Take my advice, call me.

9. Not only __________ watch the lesson, but you did the quiz as well!
a) you did
b) you don’t
c) did you
d) have you

Check your answer: b a d c b b c a c

Evolution & Migration (03)

Bold Words are target Words

  Verb Noun Adjective Adverb
1 adapt adaptation adaptable
2 difersify diverseness [nc] diverse diversely
3 evolve evolution; evolutionist
4 feature feature
5 generation generational
6 inherent inherently
7 migrate migration migratory
8 physical physical physically
9 process process
10 survive survivor; survival

 

Definitions and Samples

  1. Adapt v. To change one’s behavior so that it’s easier to live in a particular place or situation

My cats could adapt to the new mileu since we had been nomadic.

  1. Diverse adj. Various

I always give daily diverse food to my pets to avoid boredom.

  1. Evolve v. To change or develop slowly often into a better, more complex, or more advanced state

It is believed that lions have evolved from cats.

  1. Feature n. An interesting or important part, quality, ability, etc.

My new tablet has special features including water resist with the result that I can use it every where.

  1. Generation n. A group of people born and living during the same time

Today’s people behavior toward careless nature may harm the future generation.

  1. Inherent adj. Belonging to the basic nature of someone or something

Licking its delicate fur and sleeping for 18 hours a day are inherent in any kind of cat.

  1. Migration n. Movement from one place to live or work in another

America government allows yearly mass migration for 50.000 lucky people around the world to change their qualities of life.

  1. Physical adj. Relating to the body of a creature

Our next door children always do a physical abuse to my poor kitten.

  1. Process n. A series of actions that produce something

Making a high quality shoe needs a complicated process, though.

  1. Survive v. To continue living

I don’t think I can survive without playing video games every day!

 

 

 

10 websites to help improve your grammar

Grammar is an essential part of writing, as it helps to convey the message or idea you are trying to get across. That being said, most writers might agree that their grammar skills could use a little freshening up from time to time. Luckily there are various websites that exist strictly for the purpose of improving one’s grammar. If you are a writer looking to improve your grammar, be sure to check out the following sites.

WritingForward – This blog, which was created by a passionate writer, offers tons of posts on creative writing, grammar, and more. It helps writers of all kinds get ideas flowing so they always perform their best. This site also has exercises that help you brush up on your grammar and writing skills.

GrammarBook – Looking for a great site that will help you improve your grammar? Look no further than this informative site, which offers free grammar rules, fun quizzes, and a blog with lots of tips on all things writing.

Grammarly – This innovative website acts as an automated proofreader and professional grammar coach. It checks your writing for spelling and grammar errors, as well as plagiarism, so you are always sure to create the best work possible. Writers of all kinds can definitely benefit from this site.

PurdueOnlineWritingLab – The Purdue Online Writing Lab (OWL) is a helpful site that features over 200 free resources. Advance your knowledge in areas such as grammar and mechanics and learn about various writing styles. If you are interested in improving your grammar, this site can help.

GrammarBlog – If you are looking for a refreshing take on grammar, this site is perfect for you. It pokes fun of common grammar mistakes that people make every day, which can instantly put a smile on any writer’s face. Although this site doesn’t necessarily teach grammar, it does show you what not to do when you are writing.

LousyWriter – This cool site has tons of tips that will help you become a better writer. It features sections on grammar, writing styles, parts of speech, misused words, punctuation, capitalization, and more. You can also find blog posts, podcasts, and video tutorials that help you improve your grammar.

DailyGrammar – Anyone looking to brush up on their grammar skills should visit this site. It offers lots of simplified lessons and quizzes that make it easy to improve your grammar in many different ways.

ChicagoManualOfStyle – If you work with words, you may want to take some time to check out this helpful site. It features a forum where writers can correspond with one another and ask questions. You can also use several tools that help you proofread and polish your work.

GrammarGirl – Looking for an easy-to-use website that offers tips and tricks on all things writing? If so, you need to explore this site. It helps with grammar, word usage, punctuation, and more. In addition to all the helpful writing hints, there is also a free newsletter that you can subscribe to.

Dr.Grammar – This website, which was created by the University of Northern Iowa’s Department of Languages and Literature, is an excellent resource for writers looking to improve their grammar. With lots of frequently asked questions and helpful tips in many areas, you are sure to find some help on this site.

Improving your grammar is easy if you take the time to visit these sites. They all offer helpful ideas, tips, and tricks that are sure to make you a better writer in no time at all.

Guest post from Sam Landon. Sam writes for CarInsurance.org

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Business English: Making Appointments

Being able to make, change and cancel appointments is an important skill in business English. Here are some expressions you can use to do this concisely and clearly.

Asking for an appointment

(formal situations)
I would like to arrange an appointment to discuss….
Please would you indicate a suitable time and place to meet?

(neutral)
Would it be possible to meet on (date) at your / our offices to discuss…?

(informal)
Can we meet (up) to talk about…?

Suggesting a time

(neutral)
Would Tuesday suit you?
Would you be available on Tuesday?

(informal)
What about…?
Let’s say…

Agreeing to an appointment

(formal)
Thank you for your email. I would be available to discuss…. on (date) at (time and place)

(neutral / informal)
Tuesday sounds fine. Shall we say around (time) at (place)?

Saying a time is not convenient

(formal)
Unfortunately, I will be away on business during the week of July 6 – 11, so I will be unable to meet you then. However, if you were available in the following week, I would be glad to arrange a meeting with you.

I will be out of the office on Wednesday and Thursday, but I will be available on Friday afternoon.

Cancelling an appointment

(formal)
Unfortunately, due to some unforeseen business, I will be unable to keep our appointment for tomorrow afternoon.

Would it be possible to arrange another time later in the week?

(neutral)
I’m afraid that I have to cancel our meeting on Wednesday, as something unexpected has come up.

Would you be free to meet early next week?

Apologising

I apologise for any inconvenience. (formal)
I’m sorry about cancelling. (informal)

Asking for confirmation

Please confirm if this date and time is suitable / convenient for you. (neutral)
Can you let me know if this is OK for you? (informal)

Writing to someone you don’t know

If you don’t know the person, you’ll need to give some background information about yourself or your company.

I am… and I would be interested to meet you to discuss…

I would be grateful if you could indicate a convenient time to meet during this week.

I look forward to hearing from you.

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Rights and responsibilities at work

Just starting a job? Here are some useful words and phrases to describe your rights and responsibilities at work.

Most employees and employers will sign a contract, which sets out terms and conditions, salary and holiday entitlements, along with procedures forgrievances or dismissal. As contracts are legally binding, both sides should comply with these procedures and with the terms of the contract.

In some countries there is minimum wage legislation (meaning workers cannot be paid under this limit), as well as health and safety laws to protect employees from industrial and workplace accidents. Many workers (though often not those in “sensitive” sectors) can join a union, which (in return for an annual membership fee) will help to protect the workers’ rights and will negotiate pay increases for its members, or ballot (organise) strikes.

Over the last 100 years or so, workers, unions and politicians have fought for an increasing number of rights, such asanti-discrimination (making it illegal for employers to discriminate against workers on the basis of their gender, religion, sexuality or disability); maternity (and paternity) leavesick leave, and pension contributions. Some practices (such as child labour) are illegal in many countries, although the fight against exploitation still continues. A big issue now in the UK is that of unpaid internships (where graduates work for nothing except the chance to gain experience).

If employers fall foul of employment law (i.e. break the law), employees can take their employers to court to win damages. For example, this could occur for cases of unfair dismissal (illegally sacking someone), or constructive dismissal (where the employee is forced to resign).

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