Tag Archive | learning

English Phrasal Verbs (Part 3)

Part III

  1. Log on(to) to connect to the internet/a website

I open the new website, but I can’t log on; Maybe it’s under construction.

  1. Look after to take care of

Looking after a kitten is not an easy job.

  1. Look up to try to find information in a book, etc.

It rarely happens to me looking up unknown words in the dictionary since I’m getting used to search for information in the online dictionary.

  1. Make up to invent an explanation, excuse, etc.

What an ignorant boy! I can’t make up his unforgiveable mistakes.

  1. Move in to start living in a new house, etc.

I’m moving in Kyiv next month.

  1. Pay back to return money (to someone)

I feel ashamed to the owner of pet shop since I’ve never paid the money back that I borrowed two weeks ago.

  1. Pick up to lift something from the floor, a table, etc.

Kids, pick your toys up and start studying!

  1. Point out to tell someone important information

I point you out that I work every day; It’s the reason why I can’t meet you so often.

  1. Print out to make a paper copy of something on a computer

I seldom buy original books from e-bay. I only search for the free downloadable e-book versions and print them out; It’s much cheaper!

  1. Pull off to break by pulling

The careless dentist pulled my son’s tooth off by mistake yesterday; Now, I accuse and sconce him to pay $3.000.000

  1. Put away to return something to where it belongs

Thanks for borrowing the beautiful flowers; You don’t need to worry because  I’ve already put them away in the vase.

  1. Put back to return something to where it was

I want to put this book back; but i forget which rack it belongs to.

  1. Put down to stop holding

My girlfriend put her hand down from my arm when she came across her ex.

  1. Put off to delay to a later time

To put off is similar with to procrastinate, the words which I hate very much.

  1. Put on to gain (weight)

If I were you, i would put on. It’s terrible! I only can see bone and skin.

  1. Put on to start wearing (a piece of clothing)

Put your jackets and scarf on if you don’t want to get cold outside.

  1. Put out to make something stop burning

Unfortunately, the unexperienced firefighters couldn’t put the ferocious fire out resulting many ablaze electronics burnt like those in the hell.

  1. Put up to put something on a wall (ex. a picture)

We’re going to take a valentine’s day competition. Notice that the best love letters will be put up in the lobby.

  1. Read out to say something out loud which you are reading

If you want to remember the new vocabulary fast, read the words out.

  1. Rip up to tear into pieces

This illegal application letter should be ripped up asap to avoid fights.

  1. Rub out to remove with a rubber

The imprudent students can’t rub out his wrong answers since he’s written everything in ink.

  1. Run away (from) to escape by running

The little girl screams and runs away from a giant monster.

  1. Run out (of) to not have any left

Damn, we’re on the way to the jungle and now we run out of the fuel!

  1. Save up (for) to save money (for a specific purpose)

I’ve been saving up for 1 year for taking a vacation abroad.

  1. Send off to make a player leave a game

What a sly player! I wish the referee sent him off.

  1. Set off to start a journey

Finally I get my long holiday and I’m able to set off to explore the beauty of my country.

  1. Set up to start (a business, organization, etc.)

This unexperienced man had set up a leather company, but he failed in only 3 months.

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English Phrasal Verbs (Part 2)

Part II

  1. Get away with to escape punishment for

The villain, who has been in the prison for three times, had robbed the bank, but he got away with it.

  1. Get in(to) to enter a car

What a careless man! Take the purse then get into the car quickly!

  1. Get off to leave a bus, train etc.

I always get off the school bus at 7.30

  1. Get on (with) to have a good relationship (with)

Melannie can get on with everybody easily.

  1. Get on (to) to enter a bus, train etc.

You must show the ticket to the conductor after getting on the train.

  1. Get out (of) to leave a car, building, room, etc.

Quick! Get out of the car or you’ll become roast corpse!

  1. Get over to recover from (an illness)

I usually need a week to get over from flu.

  1. Get up to leave your bed

What a lazy girl! She’s always getting up after 8!

  1. Give away to give something free of charge

They’ll give a bar of chocolate away if you show that today is your birthday.

  1. Give back to return something you’ve taken/borrowed

I never give the books back to the library before the due date.

  1. Give up to stop doing something you do regularly

Enough already! I give up playing video games 3 hours a day!

  1. Go away to leave a place/someone

“You are disgusting! Telling my big secret to everyone without feeling any guilty. Now, go away!”

  1. Go back (to) to return (to)

I believe that someday I will go back to meet you in the promised land.

  1. Go off to no longer be fresh

These avocadoes have already gone off! I can’t consume them or I’ll get matters with my belly.

  1. Go on to continue happening or doing something

I go on with my homework in the classroom despite being scolded by teachers.

  1. Go on to happen

Please, don’t fire me! I assure that this pathetic experience will never go on anymore in the future.

  1. Go out to stop burning

The electronic centre, which I’m used to visiting, burnt at night and didn’t go out until the firefighter came late.

  1. Go out with to be the boyfriend/girlfriend of

Matthew is going out with Katie for 3 years now, after they met on a blind date.

  1. Grow up to become older (for children)

My cats grow up fast as I give them a lot of protein and meat.

  1. Hang on to wait

Hang on, I must answer to my mother’s question first.

  1. Hang up to put clothes in a wardrobe, etc.

I can’t hang up my clothes since I don’t have any wardrobes.

  1. Hang up to put the receiver down to end a phone call

I don’t like people who hang up without saying ‘good-bye’, it sounds rude to me!

  1. Have on to wear (a piece of clothing)

The cats have cute clothes on and are ready to hang out with my dog.

  1. Hurry up to do something more quickly

If I go with my father, I won’t need to hurry up preparing the equipment for picnic since he’s such a slow person.

  1. Join in to participate, take part

This time tomorrow I will be joining in the play.

  1. Keep out to prevent from entering

You can’t step on the grass, there’s plank written “keep out!”

  1. Leave out to not include

I don’t like Stanislav and Slava, so I leave them out attending my party.

  1. Let down to disappoint

My students’ bad behaviour always let me down.

  1. Lie down to start lying (on a bed, etc.)

I’m so tired that I lie down without take my jacket down.

  1. Log off to disconnect from the Internet/a website

I don’t know how to log off from this messy website since the appearance isn’t rather user friendly.

Petroleum Alternatives (04)

Bold Words are target Words

  Verb Noun Adjective Adverb
1 constraint constraint
2 contaminate contamination; contaminant
3 deplete depletion
4 dispose of disposal disposable
5 element elemental elementally
6 emit emission
7 extinction extinct
8 reserve reservoir
9 shrink shrinkage shrinkable
10 stable stability stable stably

 

Definitions and Samples

  1. Constraint n. Something that restricts something or someone

The major constraint of students who live in the developing country is they lack to get a part-time job to pay their fees.

  1. Contamination n. Being dangerous, dirty, or impure by adding something harmful or undesirable to it

The children’s behavior have been contaminated by their uneducated father.

plastic-waterpollution.jpg

Contamination’s everywhere & harms our earth

  1. Deplete v. To greatly reduce the amount of something

Illegal activities such as logging and mining absolutely deplete natural resources.

  1. Dispose of [phrasal verb] v. To get rid of something

Please, dispose of your cigarette into the basket bin.

  1. Elementally adv. In terms of elements

Elementally, concrete and soil are not alike.

  1. Emission n. The act of sending out of something (such as energy or gas)

Leaky emission of soil in Java by the irresponsible government has damaged adjacent local houses.

coal-power-station_1861404b.jpg

Emissions from a coal’s factory

  1. Extinction n. Completely die out

Modern lifestyle has caused the extinction of many old traditions.

Various_dinosaurs.png

Dinosaurs are good example of an extinction caused by nature

  1. Reservoir n. An artificial lake used to store a large supply of water for use in people’s homes

Dry season afflicts many reservoirs in my city.

2.jpg

Nowadays, a reservoir in my city for its beauty becomes an aim of many local tourists to visit

  1. Shrink v. Becoming smaller in amount, size, or value

Don’t boil water too much or it may shrink.

  1. Stable adj. Not easily changed because of being in a good state or condition

Her continuously work has made her life more stable than before.

Multitasking Damages Your Brain and Your Career, New Studies Suggest

Multitasking

You’ve likely heard that multitasking is problematic, but new studies show that it kills your performance and may even damage your brain. Research conducted at Standford University found that multitasking is less productive than doing a single thing at a time. The researchers also found that people who are regularly bombarded with several streams of electronic information cannot pay attention, recall information, or switch from one job to another as well as those who complete one task at a time.

A Special Skill?

But what if some people have a special gift for multitasking? The Stanford researchers compared groups of people based on their tendency to multitask and their belief that it helps their performance. They found that heavy multitaskers—those who multitask a lot and feel that it boosts their performance—were actuallyworse at multitasking than those who like to do a single thing at a time. The frequent multitaskers performed worse because they had more trouble organizing their thoughts and filtering out irrelevant information, and they were slower at switching from one task to another. Ouch.

Multitasking reduces your efficiency and performance because your brain can only focus on one thing at a time. When you try to do two things at once, your brain lacks the capacity to perform both tasks successfully.

Multitasking Lowers IQ

Research also shows that, in addition to slowing you down, multitasking lowers your IQ. A study at the University of London found that participants who multitasked during cognitive tasks experienced IQ score declines that were similar to what they’d expect if they had smoked marijuana or stayed up all night. IQ drops of 15 points for multitasking men lowered their scores to the average range of an 8-year-old child.

So the next time you’re writing your boss an email during a meeting, remember that your cognitive capacity is being diminished to the point that you might as well let an 8-year-old write it for you.

Brain Damage From Multitasking

It was long believed that cognitive impairment from multitasking was temporary, but new research suggests otherwise. Researchers at the University of Sussex in the UK compared the amount of time people spend on multiple devices (such as texting while watching TV) to MRI scans of their brains. They found that high multitaskers had less brain density in the anterior cingulate cortex, a region responsible for empathy as well as cognitive and emotional control.

While more research is needed to determine if multitasking is physically damaging the brain (versus existing brain damage that predisposes people to multitask), it’s clear that multitasking has negative effects. Neuroscientist Kep Kee Loh, the study’s lead author, explained the implications: “I feel that it is important to create an awareness that the way we are interacting with the devices might be changing the way we think and these changes might be occurring at the level of brain structure.”

Learning From Multitasking

If you’re prone to multitasking, this is not a habit you’ll want to indulge—it clearly slows you down and decreases the quality of your work. Even if it doesn’t cause brain damage, allowing yourself to multitask will fuel any existing difficulties you have with concentration, organization, and attention to detail.

Multitasking in meetings and other social settings indicates low Self- and Social Awareness, two emotional intelligence (EQ) skills that are critical to success at work. TalentSmart has tested more than a million people and found that 90% of top performers have high EQs. If multitasking does indeed damage the anterior cingulate cortex (a key brain region for EQ) as current research suggests, it will lower your EQ in the process.

So every time you multitask you aren’t just harming your performance in the moment; you may very well be damaging an area of your brain that’s critical to your future success at work.

Source

Time off – expressions

Learn the vocabulary to talk about being absent from jobs in English:

 

to take time off = to be absent from work, at home or on vacation.

I’m going to take a few days off to visit my parents.

I’m taking Monday off to go to the dentist and do some jobs at home.


to take a vacation = to take time away from work, especially when you travel for pleasure.

I’m taking my vacation next month. We’re going to Spain.

I have to take my vacation during the school holidays because of my children.


to take a sabbatical = to take time away from work to study or travel, usually while continuing to be paid.

He’s on a sabbatical while he does his MBA. He’ll be back next month.

She’s on a sabbatical from her job while she does research for her thesis.


to take unpaid leave = to have an authorized absence from work but without salary.

She’s taken some unpaid leave while she moves house.

I don’t have any paid holiday left so I’d like to take unpaid leave.


to be off sick = to be absent from work due to illness.

When you are off sick, you must provide a doctor’s note.

He has been off sick for a few days now. I think he’ll be back at work on Monday.


sick leave = the time that you can be absent from work, often while being paid part or all of your salary.

She is having an operation and so will be on sick leave for the next two months.

When you are on sick leave prescribed by your doctor, you get paid your full salary for the first three months.


maternity leave = the period a mother is legally authorised to be absent from work before and after the birth of a child.

Her maternity leave finishes next week but she is not coming back to work.

Statutory maternity leave is paid for up to 26 weeks and can start 11 weeks before the baby is due.


parental leave = the time that a parent is allowed to spend away from work to take care of their baby.

He has taken parental leave to look after the baby while his wife returns to work.

You have to work for an employer for one year to qualify for parental leave to look after your children.


statutory sick pay = the money paid by a company to an employee who cannot work due to illness.

If you are absent from work due to illness, you may be able to claim sick pay.

To claim sick pay, you have to have medical certificate from your doctor stating that you are unable to work.


a public holiday = a day when almost everybody does not have to go to work (for example in Indonesia August 17th or January 1st).

We have 25 days paid holiday plus 10 public holidays.

When there is a public holiday on a Thursday, many people take the Friday off too.

 

source

Russian Basic Pronunciation

PRONUNCIATION

In the Russian language, there are consonant and vowel letters. Russian has five vowel sounds and ten vowel letters. Five of the letters are “hard” and the rests are “soft”. The one vowel sound in each word that is stressed receives special emphasis. As you speak Russian, try in the beginning to exaggerate your pronunciation.

Consonant Letters
Russian

Letter

Russian Sound Example
б b as in bat банк
в v as in vote вот
г g as in go гол
д d as in dog да
ж zh as in azure жена
з z as in zoo за
й y as in boy мой
к k as in kayak касса
л l as in lot лампа
м m as in mall муж
н n as in note нос
п p as in papa парк
р r as in rabbit рот
с s as in sun суп
т t as in toe такси
ф f as in fund фунт
х ch as in bach, loch ах
ц ts as in tsar царь
ч ch as in cheap чнтает
ш sh as in show шапка
щ sh as in sheep щн
ъ hard sign
ь soft sign

 

VOWELS
Russian

Letter

Russian Sound Example
  HARD VOWELS  
а a as in father да
з e as in echo зхо
ы y as in hairy мы
о o as in hello но
у u as in rule ну
SOFT VOWELS
я ya as in yahoo я
е ye as in yes нет
и ee as in bee ива
ё yo as in yo-yo полёт
ю u as in union юмор

 

You know you’re in Russia when the simple sign for a restaurant looks like PECTOPAH. Actually, the Russian alphabet has only a few more letters than English. But to get started, look at the list below. Read aloud the pronunciation in the first column and then look at the Russian letters in the middle column. At the far right you’ll see the translation and you’ll be pleasantly surprised to learn how many of them you already know. After the first three words we’ll add only one new letter per word.

Pronunciation Russian English Pronunciation Russian English
da да yes zal зал hall
nyet нет no fkhot вход entrance
bank банк bank vykhat выход exit
bar бар bar tsentr центр center
park парк park byuro бюро bureau
kasa касса cashier gardirop гардероб garderobe
taksi такси taxi pochta почта post office
kiosk киоск kiosk ryat ряд row
kafe кафе café stoytye стойте Stand!
bufyet буфет buffet nye kurit не курить No smoking
mitro метро metro bal’shoy болбшой the Bolshoi
maskva москва moscow zhenski женский ladies’ (room)
aeraport азропорт airport mushkoy мужской men’s (room)
aeraflot азрофлот aeroflot yischo ещё more, else

Getting Started [Learning English]

Hello and welcome to my blog

If you are searching for the free exercise english, congratulations!!! you are in the right place. Here, I shall share my english ability and write into this blog, so as we can learn english together. This blog will be updated at least once a week and is intended to all learners, who want to expand their english grammars. You can ask or request me, considering about english grammars to write into the blog. Nobody is perfect and making error is common, if you have any questions or find any mistakes in the lessons, please feel free to send me e-mail to increase the quality of this blog. Many of lessons will be taken from the original books by L.G. Alexander, because I consider this book as a good friend to keep company with me learning English.

 

The advantage of using this blog

  1. It’s free
  2. You can ask me when you get any trouble and send e-mail to kalifatullah86@gmail.com
  3. The lessons are rich of grammars and preceded by exercises, so that you can test yourself after studying
  4. Every lesson has any relation with the previous one, so you can link your ability and intensify it step by step comprehensively, which is perfect for the continuous learners
  5. The subjects are intended for you, who have already had the basic English

 

 

Now, you can work through this example carefully and then try to figure the fundamental out. Notice that this passage uses past time verbs.

 

GRANNY FORBES

Mrs Forbes was very old and very poor. Everybody in the neighborhood called her Granny Forbes and tried to help her. Some neighbors came in each day and cooked meals for her. Others came and cleaned her room. There was little furniture in her room. It was small, dark and almost empty. There was a bed and a table, and there were two chairs. In winter, neighbors sometimes brought coal and lit a fire, but Granny’s room was often very cold. Granny lived in poverty all her life. She died at the age of eighty-four. Then her neighbors got a big surprise. She left £ 50,000!

[practice & progress by L.G. Alexander p11]